Computation

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Computation

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Computation is one of the four domains of the CT model, which focuses on the creation of a cognitive architecture that can simulate the emergent results of the empirical domains through the construction of a computational model or neural network. The aim of this domain is to reverse-engineer the vultological and behavioral effects we see in the general population, through a framework of consciousness that matches the evidence.

Cognitive Typology Architecture

See main article at: Cognitive Typology Architecture

The Cognitive Typology Architecture (CTA) is an architecture which describes the construction and management of objects through two core information systems: (P)erception and (J)udgment. The perception system manages spatiotemporal information, while the judgment system handles ideal information. Each system contains a positive (+) and negative (-) polarity, allowing for information to oscillate through the system in a feedback cycle. This creates four charge states (P+, P-, J-, J+) as the main processing modules of the architecture: Information Gathering (P+), Definitional Processing (J-), Temporal Contextualizing (P-) and Procedural Processing (J+). These four modules comprise the creation, definition, contextualization and manipulation of objects in the mental and physical world. In brief, the four modules can be described as:

  • (P+) Information Gathering – presents the information from the outer world (via the senses) into working memory.
  • (J-) Definitional Processing – works to describe the boundaries of the object by differentiating objects from one another.
  • (P-) Temporal Contextualizing – works to connect the object episodically with other instances of it across time.
  • (J+) Procedural Processing – works to understand the actions/verbs of the object, and how it moves causally in the world via positions/vectors.

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When combined, these processes allow for the registration of an object by what properties it holds, how it is distinct from other objects, how it is part of an object-set that spans across time, and how the object behaves in a causal reality.

Bias

The computational weighting, or bias, of these four modules is modeled as being asymmetrical in different subjects, causing more processing of the same objects through certain modules than others. This bias in the computational weighting of objects cascades across the psyche and leads to differences in opinions and thoughts at the highest levels of abstraction. These biases are described as four energetic types.

Information Systems

Information system refers to the two higher-order systems comprising the CTA, the perception system and judgment system, as well as any variations thereof. There are currently two known P and two known J systems that are well documented in the population, and others that are more tentatively speculated. Currently, it's speculated that the majority of the population possesses one of these two P and J variants. These information systems handle the encoding of information differently, having different algorithmic conditions. As a result, the possession of a given information system alters the style of the information that is encoded, similar to how a digital image may be encoded in various raster formats, even when an identical environmental reality is presented. These variations in information systems form an additional typological division among individuals, which intersects with energetic biasing (4x4) to form sixteen common cognitive types.

Vortical

Vortical visualization

See main article at: Vortical

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Modular

Modular visualization

See main article at: Modular

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Radial

Radial visualization

See main article at: Radial

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Gravitic

Gravitic visualization

See main article at: Gravitic

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Types

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